Insincere Apology

August 23, 2007

Recently, I wrote about a clip from CNN's "God's Warriors," which airs tonight. The clip included the late Jerry Falwell claiming just a week before he died that he stood by his controversial remarks about 9-11. Today Ethics Daily has an article about this defense offered by Falwell. The piece points out that controversy erupted after he blamed 9-11 on the ACLU, abortionists, People for the American Way, and others just two days after 9-11. Falwell then apologized for the remarks a few days later. Now, it turns out that his apology must not have been very sincere.

Robert Parham of the Baptist Center for Ethics states in the piece that Falwell's remarks in the CNN interview prove the "core dishonesty" of his apology. He added that Falwell had "spun the truth" and "lied when called to accountability for statements of hatred."

Sadly, he is not the only Christian leader to make a hateful and un-Christlike statement and then make matters worse by offering an insincere and dishonest apology. Back in June I noted that Pat Robertson (who offered his agreement with Falwell's 9-11 remarks) revisited his previous call for the U.S. to assassinate Hugo Chavez. Here is what I noted then:

At one point during the fallout of his original comments, Robertson lied and claimed he never called for an assassination. He then admitted to it and apologized. I guess he is now retracting his apology (or lied and never really meant it).
It is bad enough that some Christian leaders are making these statements. But how can they justify lying about them? We need Christian leaders who will be more loving and Christlike with their words and who are humble and honest enough to truly repent and admit their mistakes. Christianity is not well served by insincere apologies to cover up hateful remarks.