October 29, 2012

Today is the anniversary of the death of Clarence Jordan (in 1969). The co-founder of Koinonia Farms, he translated nearly the entire New Testament into the Cotton Patch Gospel version (but died before finishing the book of John or starting Revelation). Last month, I attended the first Clarence Jordan Symposium to celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth and the 70th anniversary of the founding of Koinonia. I am currently working on a book about Jordan's life, work, and words (see post here) and recently interviewed his son Lenny for WMRA (see post here). Photos from my visit to Koinonia and the Symposium can be seen here (the photo of pecan trees at Koinonia is one of them). Many of my photos from the Symposium were posted by the Symposium's Facebook page, a couple were used in a blog post by Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove (who spoke at the Symposium), three were used in a Mennonite World Review article about the Symposium (although only one is included online), and one was used today in an online Mennonite World Review column by Wilson-Hartgrove. Since today is the anniversary of Jordan's death, Wilson-Hartgrove, fellow Symposium speaker Shane Claiborne, and Enuma Okoro devote today's entry in their devotional book Common Prayer Pocket Edition: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals to Jordan. It is good that they call us to remember this modern, American saint and his radical messages. Hopefully more attention will be given to Jordan's teachings and writings because his messages are still timely and needed.