Basilica of St. John

July 12, 2014

Basilica of St. John
(photo credit: Brian Kaylor)
With the Annual Gathering of the Baptist World Alliance being in Izmir, Turkey this week, today's agenda called for some sightseeing of biblical and early church history sites. We spent the morning in Ephesus, which was amazing (I will write about that and share photos in a later post). In the afternoon, we visited a couple of local industries - rugs and leather - and saw interesting displays and incredible craftsmanship at both (I will write about those and share photos in a later post). We ended the afternoon with a visit to the ruins of the Basilica of St. John.


Baptismal at Basilica of St. John
(photo credit: Brian Kaylor)
The Basilica of St. John marked the place where it is believed that the disciple John was buried, which is plausible since church tradition says he moved to nearby Ephesus after leaving the island of Patmos. In the 4th Century, a basilica was built at the site, which shows that fairly early on this site received its connection to John's burial. After that building laid in ruins, Emperor Justinian built the Basilica of St. John at the site in the 6th Century. This much larger structure was modeled after the Church of the Holy Apostles that then stood in Constantinople. Now, however, only ruins of the basilica are left. Although much of the structure has been destroyed, the parts that remain are still impressive. And some parts - like the baptismal built into the floor - are clearly seen. It was a fascinating place to visit, and an exciting step back into church history as I saw the presumed tomb of John and walked where Christians worshiped centuries ago. You can view more photos from my visit to the Basilica of St. John here.

At tomb of John
(photo credit: random tourist)

0 comments